gMax 1.0 custom mod to 1.5/XL (am I crazy?)

#1
So after being a little envious of the build height on the gMax 1.5 and 1.5XL I pondered converting my gMax 1.0, but with also using the extra small pieces of extruded aluminum from it to get extra height.

I started by pulling STL files from the 1.0 and 1.5 builds into SketchUp and came up with what I have so far in the attached photos. The extra supports I added are to try and stack the aluminum frame pieces (17" and 8") together and keep them vertical and stable, which I may have gone overboard on. I plan on using aluminum angle brackets on the front of each vertical section instead of the front, and kept the Z-Axis mounts and parts because it seems like I can get more print area in the X-Axis that way.

Anyhow, I realize I missing parts on my cad drawing so far, but I'm curious if people think this is an interesting and worthwhile idea/build, or if there are inherent flaws in my logic that would prevent this from working out. Any thoughts are welcome. :)
 
#3
Thanks for the idea and link Kyle that sounds like a great way to go!

My goal for all of this was to make it as quick and cheap as possible, but while still making it stable with the extra height. So far I think I can do most of it (except for longer wires & new connectors) for about $60.

I get to order the parts in the next couple weeks and and will begin printing parts later this week, hopefully using the 0.8mm Volcano hot-end for strong parts. =]
 
#5
Finally after lots planning and a couple blocks of time, I have a success mod of my gMax 1.0 to well... sort of a gMax 1.5XL. The pictures below will give you an idea of how it turned out, although I'm not quite done tweaking. I still have my own print bed upgrade I made that needs to be added, but I'm thrilled about the gain in build height (~19" now)! Especially after loosing an inch or two due to the E3D hot-ends.

I will post updates later as to quality and accuracy, especially with tall prints.
 
#6
BTW I didn't clarify that this mod uses the 17" and 8" pieces of 1.5" aluminum rail from the gMax 1.0 and butts them end-to-end with supports to make two 25" lengths of aluminum for height. So far it seems plenty rigid and stable.

If anyone is interested in the parts I printed or bought to perform the modifications just reply back here and I'll get them to you.

Next modifications will be:
- "Beefier" customized print bed for hot swapping bed materials
- X-Axis carriage add-on for Discov3ry Paste Extruder
- X-Axis complete mod to the gMax 1.5+ style, with removable print head
- Z-Axis mod to remove smooth rod and use wheels long vertical frame (like gMax 1.5+)
 
#7
Hello! Im new in the 3d printing world and I just read your comment about adapting the Discov3ry paste extruder to your upgraded printer so I was wondering how easy it would be to adapt one myself to a gMax 1.5 XT, the Structur3d page posted a few questions to find out if it can be easily adaptable but since Im still learning and this would be a good reason to get my gMax 1.5 XT Im hoping you can answer this for me pleeeeease :mrgreen:

1) Are your electronics based off the RAMPs architecture? Are they accessible?
2) Does your printer work with open-sourced software?
3) Is the extruder motor a NEMA17 stepper motor?
4) Is the nozzle chassis easy to access in order add or change extruder tips?

PS: sounds like an amazing idea what youre doing!Let us know how it went
 
#8
Hi Caleb, I have a Gmax 1.0 and I would definitely be interested in the files and the parts required to make the upgrade. Any help would be much appreciated! Thanks - Mike
 
#9
Hi Mike,

Apologies for my super-delayed reply, I haven't been on the forum in quite a while. I'd be happy to share my Sketchup and STL files for the mod I did, and I sent you a forum message with my email address that you can reach me at to send you the files.


Also to lorenb-id, a quick answer to all of your questions is actually 'Yes'. I have a RAMPS 1.4 board that's fairly accessible, it's on the Marlin firmware, uses a NEMA17 style motor, and the nozzle chassis is easy to access, or at least if you design it that way it will be.